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Monthly Archives: July 2009

Write a Novel Step 5 Victims and Villain

Since my last post, I have been trying to decide who my villain was so that I could develop him/her.  It has been difficult because I had no clue as to his/her identity.  All I knew was what I wanted my villain to do. So in the process I lost a victim and gained a villain.  In my last post, I had a professor who I intended to be my second victim.  He had so many traits that I liked, I couldn’t just kill him off, and so he has become my villain.  I guess I wanted to spend more time with him.

 

In this whole process, I have also decided to change his last name.  After working with him, he felt more like a Schroeder than a Hollingsworth.  I also changed the one victim’s name from Morton to Chambers.  Don’t know why, just felt compelled to change them.

 

I had originally cast the victim – Bradley as someone who was in advertising.  He is now a lawyer.

 

The villain is Ben Schroeder, an English teacher at a community college who likes to cross-dress.  He is 38 years old, 5’10” and weighs a slight 160.  He appears effeminate which helps because it enables him to appear as a woman better.  He is an only-child who witnessed his mother and aunt as they killed his father.  Their story was that he left them when Ben was very young. Ben was so young that he isn’t sure about what he saw.  He thinks of it as a bad dream.  His mother and aunt instilled in him that women were better than men and that is why he feels need to dress like a woman, even though it is secretly. His biggest fear is that the college will find out his secret and he could lose his job.  He is jealous of authors who have succeeded where he has failed.  He knows Rachel from when she was in college. He saw her talent and envied her abilities.  He tried to become close to her but she wasn’t interested. He still holds a grudge against her for that and now that she has become a published author and he has failed, his jealousy is even fiercer.

Bradley, who is Rachel’s fiancé is a cheater, always has been, always will be.  Ben has been following Rachel’s career ever since she shunned him while she was in college.  Haven’t worked out all of the details as to his rage but he is so jealous of Rachel, he not only wants her career, he wants her life.  He finds out about her engagement and decides to meet her fiancé.  One night while out drinking, he meets Ben in his female persona and picks him up. Bradley passes out before anything goes too far. In Ben’s sick twisted mind, he decides that if he can’t have Bradley, than Rachel can’t either and he plans to kill him and starts his path to destroy Rachel.

 

I have definitely developed more of my story while creating my characters. 

Nothing is set in stone at this time, so don’t be surprised if things change along the way.

Over the next few days, I will be developing more of my characters, specifically the innocent suspects. 

 

I am enjoying the experience, so far.  Though it is fun, it is work.  Hopefully I can keep piecing the puzzle together in a logical and entertaining way. 

 

How is your story going?  Are you creating well-rounded characters or do they feel flat?  If so, I would suggest getting deeper into their goals and motivations.

 

Until next time,

 

Virginia

 
 

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Upcoming Conferences and Workshops

Alaska

Wrangell Mountains Writing Workshop – Aug 12 – 18

Alaska Writers Guild Workshop – Aug 22, 23

 

Arizona

Wrangling with Writing – Sept 26 – 27

Casa Libre en la Solana – Year Round

 

California

Fisherman’s Wharf Writers Conference – Oct 21 -25

Squaw Valley Community of Writers – Aug 1 -8

Mendocino Coast Writers Conference – Jul 30 – Aug 2

Santa Barbara Summer Poetry Workshop – Aug 1 -3

Book Passage Travel Writers & Photographers Conference – Aug 13 -16

The Pacific Coast Children’s Writers Workshop – Aug 21 -23

Women Writing the West Annual Conference – Sept 11-13

Southern California Writers Conference – L.A. – Sept 25 -27

Central Coast Writers’ Conference – Oct 2,3

Central Coast Book & Author Festival – Oct 4

Litquake – Oct 9-17

Jack London Writers Conference – Oct 10,11

Tomales Bay Writers’ Workshop – Oct 21 =25

 

Connecticut

Sunken Garden Poetry Festival – Jun 10 – Aug 5

 

Washington D.C.

The Hyman S. & Freda Bernstein Jewish Literary Festival – Oct 18-28

 

Florida

The Anhinga Writers’ Studio Summer Workshops Jul 29 – Aug 1

Atlantic Center for the Arts – Year Round

The Studios of Key West – Year Round

 

Georgia

National Black Arts Festival – Jul 29-Aug 2

Scribblers’ Retreat Writers’ Conference Aug 13 -16

Southern Women Writers Conference – Sept 244-26

Chattahoochee Valley Writers’ Conference – Sept 25, 26

Georgia Literary Festival – Oct 16 -18

 

Hawaii

Hawaii Writers Conference & Retreat – Aug 28 – Sept 3, Sept 4 -7

 

Idaho

Sun Valley Writers Conference – Aug 21 -24

 

Illinois

Noethwestern University Summer Writer’s Conference – Aug 12 -14

Writers in the Heartland – Sept – Oct

The Ragdale Foundation – Year Round

Writer’s Studio – Year Round

 

Kansas

The Great Manhattan Mystery Conclave – Oct 30 – Nov 1

 

Kentucky

Writers Retreat Workshop – Aug 21 -30

Kentucky Women Writers Conference – Sept 10 -12

Carnegie Center for Literacy & Learning – Year Round

 

Maine

The Salt Institute for Documentary Studies – Sept – Dec

MWPA Fall Writing Retreat – Sept 11 -13

 

Maryland

Baltimore Book Festival – Sept 25 -27

F. Scott Fitzgerald Literary Conference – Oct 17

The Writer’s Center – Year Round

 

Massachusetts

Colrain Poetry Manuscript Conference – Aug 14 -17, Sept 18-21, Oct 23-26

Cape Cod Writers’ Center- Annual Summer Writers’ Conference & Young Writers Workshop – Aug 15-22

Patchwork Farm Retreat – Stump Sprouts – Oct 1-4

Massachusetts Poetry Festival – Oct 15-18

Amherst Writers & Artists – Year Round

 

Michigan

Ludington Writers Conference – Sept 17-19

Springfed Arts – Writers’ Retreat – Oct 8-11

The Box Factory for the Arts – Year Round

 

Minnesota

The Loft Literary Center – Year Round

 

Mississippi

Mississippi Writers Guild Conference – Aug 14,15

 

Missouri

Flathead River Writers Conference – Oct 1-5

Greater  St. Louis Chapter Sisters in Crime – Sept 25, 26

 

Montana
Montana Festival of the Book – Oct 22-24

 

Nebraska

Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts Residencies – Year Round

 

New Hampshire

Star Island Retreat – Aug 31 – Sept 4

 

New Jersey

The Poetry Center – Year Round

 

New Mexico

Taos Writing Retreat for Health Professional 0 Aug 2-8

A Room Of Her Own Foundation – Aug 10-16

 

New York

Millay colony for the Arts – Apr – Dec

The Edward F. Albee Foundation – May – Oct

Vassar College & New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Apprentice Training Program – Jun 19 – Aug 2

Fort Green Park Summer Literary Festival – Jul 11- Aug 15 (workshops) Aug 22 (festival)

Southampton Screenwriting Conference – Jul 29- Aug 2

Southampton Playwriting Conference – Jul 8 – Aug 2

Brooklyn Book Festival – Sept 13

Writing By Degrees – Sept 24-26

&Now Festival of Innovative Writing & the Literary Arts – Oct 14-17

The Downtown Writer’s Center – Year Round

Gotham Writers’ Workshop – Year Round

 

North Carolina

Carolina Mountains Literary Festival – Sept 11,12

The Writers’ Workshop of Asheville – Year Round

 

Oregon

The Margery Davis Boyden Wilderness Writing Residency – Apr – Oct

Willamette Writers Conference – Aug 7-9

Wordstock – Oct 8-11

Fishtrap, Inc. – Year Round

 

Pennsylvania

Stillwater Poetry and Music Festival – Sept 12

Founders Workshops – Year Round

 

 

Rhode Island

Star Island Writing Retreat – Aug 31 – Sept 4

 

South Dakota

John R. Milton Writers’ Conference – Oct 29-31

 

Tennessee

Writing the Breakout Novel with Donald Maass – Sept 21 -27

Gemini Ink – Year Round

SMU Continuing Studies Creative Writing Program – Year Round

 

Vermont

Postgraduate Writers’ Conference – Aug 11 -17

Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference – Aug 12 -23

Burlington Book Festival – Sept 24-27

Brattleboro Literary Festival – Oct 2 -4

Great Rivers Arts Institute – Literary Arts Programs – Year Round

 

Virginia

Fall for the Book – Sept 21-26

James River Writers – Oct 9-10

Emory & Henry College Literary Festival – Oct 29,30

The Porches Writing Retreat – Year Round

 

Washington

PNWA Summer Writers Conference – Jul 30 – Aug 2

Orca Island Writers Festival – Sept 17-20

Write on the Sound – Oct 2 -4

 

West Virginia

West Virginia Book Festival – Oct 10,11

 

Wisconsin

Spring Green Literary Festival – Sept 11,12

 
 

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What’s Happening in July

Francesca Hawley’s book Protect and Defend is now also available in print from Elora’s Cave/Jasmine Jade Enterprises.  The buy page is http://jasminejade.com/p-7481-protect-and-defend.aspx.

Carla Cassidy has a new release this month – Pregnsia.  You can find it at your favorite bookstore.

Lois Greiman is part of an anthology that came out in June  – Faeries Gone Wild – at your favorite bookstore.

Watch for new author updates  and interviews coming soon.

August –

Richard Jay Parker, Lori Wilde, and Kylie Brant

And as always, if you want more writing related articles, check out Cheryl’s www.learntowritefiction.com 

Keep writing and of course keep reading.

Virginia

 
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Posted by on July 26, 2009 in What's Happening

 

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Book Review – A Year on Ladybug Farm

Title: A Year on Ladybug Farm

Author: Donna Ball

Publisher: Berkley

Publication Date: March 2009

1st Edition

Pages: 374

Price: $14.00

ISBN: 978-0-425-22587-5

 

A Year on Ladybug Farm is the story of three women in their fifties who strike out on an adventure together. When Bridget’s husband dies, the women who have lived most of their adult lives on the same street and have travelled the world together decide it might be time to purchase a home together.  They find a run down mansion in the Shenandoah Valley that they each fall in love with.  Cici wants to make use of her skills with tools, while Lindsey pictures the dairy barn becoming her art studio and Bridget is in love with the kitchen.  If nothing else, Cici runs the numbers and decides that with the needed improvements, it could be a great investment. The house gets its name from the multitude of ladybugs found in the vacant house.  They feel the ladybug is a good omen and decide to give it a year to see whether they feel the same way at years end.

 The main characters are Cecille Burke, a divorced, REALTOR with a daughter in college and an ex-husband who is wealthy and hob knobs with Hollywood celebrities.  Lindsey Wright is a single, teacher and an artist who seemed to have postponed her own attempts as an artist, while Bridget Tyndale is a recent widow with two grown children whose cooking skills make her the one the other two turn to for catering the grand parties, the three women have a reputation for putting together.

 The characters feel whole; in fact, I would love to find friends like them.  I was not ready to let the characters go by story’s end.  Luckily, I discovered a sequel coming out in October. 

 The author wove a ghost, other quirky characters, and subplots to make a most enjoyable read.  Her description of setting was realistic and pulled me deeper into the story.

 I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys heart-warming stories about women who have lived long enough to experience life’s ups-and-downs and still have the courage to find new adventures.

 
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Posted by on July 24, 2009 in Book Review

 

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Want to Write A Novel – Secondary Characters

If you have been following my blog, you know that the past few days, I’ve been working on secondary characters, specifically victims, because I am writing a mystery.

 The how-to book I am using, suggested that my story have three crimes with three victims, haven’t quite got there yet.  I have two crimes and two victims.

 The first victim came to me when I started developing my original idea.  That victim is my protagonist’s, (sleuth’s) fiancé Brad.  Because these characters don’t have a huge part in the story, I’m not spending as much time developing them that I will on the protagonist (sleuth), antagonist (villain) and some other secondary characters that support the story with possible sub-plots.

 Bradley Morton is 45 years old, 6’ tall, dark hair with distinguished gray temples; he is smart but somewhat smarmy. The protagonist’s friends have thought this every since they first met him.  He cheats on Rachel.  The villain will use him as a pawn to get back at Rachel. Since it will help the story if the victims have secrets, his secrets are that he cheats and gambles and Rachel doesn’t know about it. 

 The second crime is the murder of one of Rachel’s college professors.  He is Benjamin Hollingsworth.  He is 46 years old. (For some reason my protagonist is attracted to older men.) Benjamin is 5’10” tall slender with an almost feminine structure and features.  He likes to dress as a woman and that is his main secret.  He also flirts with the coeds, not necessarily, because he is interested in them but because he likes to check out their beauty secrets.

 Some of his other secrets that may come into the story, or may not are: He resents students who have succeeded where he failed with his writing.  He drinks a lot. He does have a completed manuscript that has made the rounds to lots of publishers.

 As for the crimes themselves, they will both be murders that happen in the bedroom.  The first is Bradley, the fiancé and as I explained before, he will die while with another woman but Rachel will make it look like she was the person he was with, at the time.  It saves her pride until the police discover that he was poisoned.

 Ben’s death will be similar.  Rachel will have had some contact with Ben after Bradley’s death.  He will die while with someone else, but what connects the crime to Rachel is that, that someone will plant a personal item of Rachel’s at the scene.

 I may need to create another crime but for now, I think I will leave it with these two and go on.

 I hope you are having as much fun developing your story and characters as I am.  If you want to give me suggestions or any comments about what we are doing, please do so.  I hope you will continue following my adventure and I really hope you are writing along with me. 

I will be developing a separate page on my blog with the each step we take while writing this novel.  If you are joining me now and want to catch up, that is where you should go.

 Our next step is creating the antagonist (villain). 

 Until next time,

 Virginia

 

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Interview with a Poet – Dennis Maulsby

n1467420117_3962It is my pleasure to introduce a friend and local poet, Dennis Maulsby.  I know Dennis because we both belong to the Border’s writing group.  This group has been around for over 10 years.  It started out at the local Barnes and Noble but migrated to Borders a few years back.  Because it is a public group, our demographics change frequently. Dennis has been a great addition.  The group has been a success story, in that several members have published.  So if you happen to be in the Des Moines area around 7:00 PM on a Tuesday night, feel free to stop by and join us.

 Dennis has published in several publications and I think of him as our local poet laureate.  He writes mostly about his experiences while in Vietnam and I felt this would be appropriate so close to July 4th

 Virginia – Where are you from?

 Dennis – If I was to respond typically, I would say: I was born and raised in Marshalltown, Iowa, graduated from Marshalltown High School (1960), and Grinnell College (1964), Grinnell, Iowa.

 Responding as a writer, I would say: I was from war.  I was driven to writing after a year in Vietnam that featured the battle at Kai San and the Tet Offensive.

 Virginia – What do you write?

 Dennis – Most of my poems and short stories deal with that experience.  All my Vietnam poems spring from the personal emotional impact of that war and its relentless memories.  Some of the poems have some elements that I did not experience directly, but relate to veterans’ common experience, both as soldiers and civilians.

 My memories of Vietnam have not dulled with the years.  At night in dreams, or in pensive moments, they have refreshed themselves too many times.  Perhaps, this is the way it is with all veterans.

 There is no question that PTSD plagued me.  My first six months after being dumped back into civilian life were hell.  I learned that this was an affliction that must be worked constantly, like an alcoholic – once scrabbling day at a time.  In casting around for ways to cope, I discovered creative activity pushed the demons back.  Writing has been the best.

 Virginia – How long have you been writing?

 Dennis – Ten years ago, I joined a writers’ group and the creative writing process has been the most successful therapy.  I can only speculate on the reasons.  However, I believe writing to have an almost limitless canvas, especially in English.

There are over a million words in the language, as compared to French, for example that gets by with somewhat less than four hundred thousand –pauvre Francais. The various combinations, arrangements and permutations of a million words with new ones being added everyday must be almost infinite.  Certainly, enough to last my creative lifetime – so, I am a poet, a short story writer and perhaps, a novelist.

 I started building a literary resume by submitting individual works, both poetry and short stories, to journals I thought matched my style.

 Virginia – How many books/poems have you published so far?

 Dennis – There are lots of rejections, but sometimes lightening would strike.  My writings have been published in the last eight volumes of Lyrical Iowa, the annual anthology of the Iowa Poetry Association.  Others have appeared in the Des Moines Register, The Hawkeye, Peregine, The North American Review, Tapestries, Types and Shadows, Fiele-Festa, and The Hawai’i Pacific Review.  Some on Internet sites including Writetherapy, Speaking Leaves, Words on a Wire, Brick & Mortar, Voices in Wartime  and the International War Veterans’ Poetry Archives.  In May 2004 my poem 6 June, Omaha Beach  was featured with a musical background on National Public Radio’s Themes & Variations.  Listen for yourself: http://iwvpa.net/maulsby-d/omaha-be.php 

 My first book of poetry, Remembering Willie, and all the others was published in 2003 and won the Military Writers Society of America Silver Medal Award.

 Remembering Willie is included in the Veterans’ archives of The Library of Congress and is on display at the Sullivan Brothers Iowa Veterans Museum. From Remembering Willie:

             Memory of a Eurasion Working Girl

 

            I hope she knew why I was so quiet,

            When we held hands at night in her strange land,

            Uninvited and lost.

           

            It must have made her uneasy, watching for cues

            From this twice her size round-eyed male creature,

            So large pored and hairy.

 

            Blood-warm breeze felt so comfortable.

            Her perfume riffing in the air,

            Set time for the music.

 

            That evening she pierced my blind stare,

            And helped me lay down my mountain of stored up death,

            So weary with the weight.

           

            Whether she was aware or not,

            She did what women have done for soldiers

            These thousands of futile years.

 

            Fingers entwined our primal spirits touched

            And I remembered

            What my soul should look like.

 

I write often – both poetry and prose – because I must.

 Virginia – What is your writing day like?

 Dennis – Most of my early ideas come from 3:00 to 4:30 AM sweat-soaked dreams about my experiences or nightmarish variations on them, some from daydreams or flashbacks.

 At this time, the process is more normal and poetry/story ideas come from the observation of people and places, imagination and research flesh out the details.  I have recently completed drafts of a book of linked short stories and a book of poetry.

 Virginia – What are you working on now?

 Dennis – I’ll be retiring from my day job on July 31st, 2009 and plan to work on the drafts until they are ready to submit.  I have a list of 147 small presses.  Do you think those will be enough?

 I also have developed a one to two hour (your choice) workshop.  In a relaxed group setting, participants discuss some very old forms of Japanese poetry (Tanka, Haiku, and Senryu) and how they evolved.  Once grounded, we examine how they impacted American poets and how American poets have impacted them (The American Sentence). We practice writing a few lines while simultaneously looking for ways the forms can give us insight into the poetic moment.  And, how looking for these moments may improve our other poetry and our prose.  Email me, if you are interested.  (dennismaulsby@yahoo.com)

 I have had great good fortune of being supported by several exceptional local writers’ groups. 

 Virginia – Do you have some words of wisdom for us unpubs?

 Dennis – Writing the material was good therapy, but reading to a group increased the healing value by several orders of magnitude.  My first group encouraged me to assemble my book and helped with the editing and layout.  I owe them a lot.

 Don’t be afraid to write honestly.  Sometimes that requires you to go mentally naked with friends or relatives, or to violate the restrictive cultural codes we were taught.  I would also recommend the summer workshops at the University of Iowa.  They have a Summer Writing Festival consisting of one week or weekend workshops on most every type of writing (poetry, novels, short stories, screenplays, memoirs, children’s books, etc.) all taught by experienced authors.  People come from all over the world for these sessions.  Check it out (http://continuetolearn.uiowa,edu/iswfest/).

 
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Posted by on July 22, 2009 in Author Interview

 

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Introducing: Cheryl St. John

cherylstjohn1If you love a story that touches your heart, you need to read everything Cheryl St. John writes.  Cheryl belongs to the Heartland Writers Group out of Omaha, Nebraska.  I met her too many years ago to admit and have been hooked on her books ever since. 

 Here is out interview –

 Virginia – Where are you from?

 Cheryl – I’m a Midwest girl, born in Iowa, but raised in Nebraska.  I live in a big city, however, so don’t ask me about cows or corn – unless it’s Cornhuskers, and then I’m all over that.  Go Huskers!

 Virginia – How long have your been writing?

 Cheryl – I’ve always written in one form or another.  As a child, I wrote stories, drew the covers, and stapled them into mini-books.  My first rejection came at age fourteen when I submitted a romantic short story to Redbook Magazine.  I still have the form rejection.  I was crushed.

 I wrote long hand off and on after that, occasionally typing a story on my Grandma St. John’s manual typewriter.  For years, I pretty much dedicated myself to my family, and raised my four kids.  I used to read only horror, mystery and mainstream novels, but I read a few Victoria Holt’s I’d received from the book club and found them appealing, yet somewhat unsatisfactory in some way I couldn’t define at the time.

 On a whim one day, while browsing the store shelves, I bought Lisa Gregory’s The Rainbow Season and LaVyrle Spencer’s Hummingbird.  Imagine that out of all the books available, I chose those two classic romances for my first taste of romance!  Needless to say, I was hooked from that day forward.  I devoured everything either of those two authors ever wrote, and went on to Janelle Taylor, Jude Deveraux, Johanna Lindsey, Francine Rivers, and Kathleen Woodiwiss.

 When my youngest daughter went to Kindergarten, I was lost without her.  In retrospect, it was empty nest syndrome, but instead of having another baby, which many women do, I decided it was time to write the novel that would launch me to stardom.

 Yeah, right.  The rest of the process took a little longer.  And I’m still not sure about the stardom part.

 Virginia – What do you write?

 Cheryl – I’ve written several contemporaries, but I love writing historical romance set in the American West or Midwest, and I love cowboys.  I love stories with an underdog, and those in which a character is pretending to be someone he or she is not.

Virginia – Tell us a little about your publisher and agent.

 Cheryl – Harlequin publishes my books.  I’ve written for several lines and worked with a few different editors over the years.  My agent is my intercessor and the left side of my brain, so to speak.  She handles money and contracts and leaves the creative side to me.  She believed in me from the beginning and sold my very first book for me.

 Virginia – How many books have you published so far?

 Cheryl – See, now this is a tough question – because I am so not a numbers person.  I always have to go count when someone asks me this.

 

The Preacher’s Wife is my thirty-second published book.  I’ve written number thirty-three and it’s scheduled for next year.  I’m working on two more right now.

 Virginia – What is your writing day like?

 Cheryl – It’s changed over the years as my life has changed.  I went from dropping off kids at school to having an empty nest and am now back to dropping off one child-my grandson-at school most mornings.  I get up and feed him and get him ready and drop him off at school.  Sometimes I stop at the grocery store or if it’s Thursday or Friday, I scope out every garage sale in the vicinity on the way back.  It inspires me.  That’s my story, and I’m sticking with it.

 Once home I make a fresh pot of tea – chai is my preference – read through my email, take care of the things that are pressing that day, and then open my Word file.

 I read over what I wrote the day before, edit a little, as I go, and then continue forward.  Many nights after supper and my favorite evening shows, like American Idol and Bones, I go back to my desk and work.  If my brain is too tired to write much past 11 or 12, I do promo work and blog.

 I teach an online class each month, so the night I need to prepare lessons, I’m sometimes up until 2 03.

 Bookmark my workshop:  http://cheryl-stjohn-workshop.blogspot.com/

 Virginia – Can you tell us how you found a publisher and/or agent?

 Cheryl – The really stupid way, I assure you.  I was clueless, unlike the beginning writers today who have the Internet and online communities.  I didn’t even know any other writers to ask about the process.  Looking back on my amateurish manuscript preparation, all the stories with no plot or conflict, and the volume of editors I sent the manuscripts to is a humiliating, yet laughable experience.  I can’t believe I did that!  I wrote in a vacuum for years, reading how-to-books from the library and sending stuff out to everyone in The Writer’s Market.  Those early books are still on a shelf in my basement, along with a few others. And rightly so.

 Virginia – Do you have anything that just came out?

 her-montana-man-cheryl-st-john

Cheryl – My December Her Montana Man was picked up by Doubleday and Rhapsody Bookclubs in hardcover, and I was excited about that!  It has a stunning cover – one of my all time favorites.

 hannahs-beau-cover-189x300

June 2009 is the release of my first Steeple Hill Love Inspired Historical, and I couldn’t be more pleased with this venture into the inspirational market.  It’s a story I wanted to tell for a long time, and then this wonderful venue opened up for me to leap into.

 Virginia – What are you working on now?

 Cheryl – I’m writing a Love Inspired Historical novella for a two-in-one anthology for Mother’s day of 2010.  And putting together a sequel to The Preacher’s Wife – its Elizabeth’s story.

 Virginia – Do you have some words of wisdom for us unpubs?

 Cheryl – Believe in yourself and your ability.  All the techniques of writing are learnable, so stay open to those, but the gift of storytelling and the desire to write are talents you were born with.  Your talent doesn’t up and desert you when life is difficult or you’re struggling.  Some of my best work was done during times of emotional upheaval.  Let those times be a catharsis for your work.  Stories are about feelings.

 I’ve just launched a brand new website and I’d be delighted for you to drop by and visit.

 Visit me on the web: http://www.cherylstjohn.net/

 Look who’s blogging: http://cherylstjohn.blogspot.com/

 Thanks Cheryl for taking the time for this interview and I look forward to seeing you soon!

 Virginia

 Author Alert: If you would like me to post an interview with you on my blog, please comment and let me know.

 
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Posted by on July 22, 2009 in Author Interview

 

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